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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
across the country. >> we're going to change to debt ceiling now. white house leader eric cantor says the gop -- they're going to give them a three-month reprieve, they're going to temporarily approve a debt limit increase. the president said no negotiating on the debt limit ceiling. is this a victory for the president or do you see this as just a postponing of the inevitable standoff? >> it's both. it is a victory for the president, the republicans have been saying, we're not going to raise the debt ceiling unless we have every dollar of the debt ceiling goes to spending of that same amount. they've conceded they're going to extend the debt ceiling without any cuts. but that moves us to now where government funding expires on march 31th. at that point, we'll have a s w showdown in which republicans insist on spending cuts. there will still be some kind of fight. we will have a clock to some kind of catastrophic event that could happen, like we had in december. but it would not be with the debt ceiling. the republicans seem to have conceded to the obama. they're worried that obama ha
the enlisted men and women who serve for the u.s. military. >> hmm. we have to talk debt ceiling, peter, because there's been this talk of minting that trillion-dollar coin. that is now off the table. so is the white house looking at another big fight here, and do you think if so it's on par with what we saw at the fiscal cliff? >> i think in many ways this one could be a lot more significant. this could be a lot more difficult than the fiscal cliff. there was a deadline for that and that was an issue that a lot of people felt would be resolved ultimately in some form the way that it was. the debt ceiling crisis does sort of put these o'two sides, the republicans and democrats and the white house and congress head to head. once again right now, the republicans have insisted that the only way they will raise that debt ceiling past the 16.4 trillion mark where it is right now is if they get dollar for-dollar spending cuts that match that raise. the president has said, his press secretary has said, they will not negotiate on this issue. on the fiscal cliff issue they were willing to negoti
intimating at this point that they're going to be some short-term extension in the debt ceiling and focus on spending. they seem -- you know, they seem to be a little bit hesitant to allow themselves to be set up again as people that are trying to destroy the economy. they're tired of being put in that position where they're holding back the economy. and i think it was the accusation in the first place, but they're sensitive to this point and they're going to roll over. >> they're very sensitive. the political realities of the situation is that i think we all know what needs to be done longer term. the reality is can they get any of this done in the next two months? and that's a much bigger question. i think they're trying to figure that out right now? >> well, we will have people that will argue that we don't have a spending problem, that president obama said we're going to have an economist on today on how you get -- you know, we're going to talk to him. he says the one thing that would hurt the economy is in cuts in social security or medicare or medicaid. any type of reform to those t
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)